Rethink Methane: Getting Above the Crust

rethinkmethane-header-logo-logistics-850x100The “Rethink Methane: Removing the Fossil from the Fuel” conference in Sacramento hosted leading policymakers and businesses to discuss a key ingredient to a sustainable future: methane.  Historically we’ve used “prehistoric” methane created millions of years ago. It is time to shift to “contemporary” or “renewable” methane made in current-day times via the treatment of wastewater, organic waste, and other biological feedstocks.

DSC_1889 Chris Kasper at Rethink MethaneWhat we know:

  • Methane is a critical energy resource and will continue to be for the foreseeable future
  • Methane is also a powerful greenhouse gas, and reducing emissions of methane is central to any strategy to address climate protection
  • CA has recognized the importance of reducing methane emissions, and has laid out a strategy to do so in the recently published Proposed Short Lived Climate Pollutant Reduction Strategy
  • As the vast majority of the state’s methane emissions come from the decay of organic matter, in order to achieve a significant reduction in the contribution of methane to the state’s GHG inventory, these biological sources of methane need to be captured, harnessed and beneficially reused

The challenge that we face is how to, in the face of historically low fossil gas prices, develop a system of policies, programs and incentives that help address the legal and regulatory barriers that impede the development of renewable gas resources and encourage the production and consumption of this valuable energy resource in CA.

DSC_1916 Chris Kasper and Mary Nichols at Rethink MethaneThis is the purpose of Rethink Methane – to explore the impediments to harnessing renewable gas – the fugitive emissions of which have been identified as a major contributor to climate change – and to identify the actions that CA policymakers can and should take to discourage fugitive emissions, encourage beneficial reuse, encourage the substitution of renewable gas for fossil gas as much as possible, and encourage the substitution of renewable gas for fossil diesel wherever possible.

Highlight of the Day: Harvest CEO Chris Kasper introducing the “Queen of Green” and Chair of the California Air Resources Board, Mary Nichols.

 

Pumping Value out of Pumpkins: Food Waste Growth Markets

Pumpkins and Other Food WasteThe growth strategy firm, Innosight, published a piece, “The Food Waste Opportunity: How Experiments Can Open New Growth Markets.”  It explores the burgeoning food waste industry and highlights Harvest as a leader in providing organic management solutions.

Here’s one slice of the story:

This Cinderella transformation of discarded food is just one example of how marketplace experiments can help spur new growth markets. Venture capitalists are believers: Harvest Power has raised more than $350 million, making it one of the best-funded startups in New England.

And another bit:

Because food is an organic compound and readily biodegradable, one might assume that all this waste is not a major problem. However, consider this. Food takes resources to produce-water, land, fertilizer, energy. It’s heavy and expensive to transport. As food lies in a landfill, it decomposes and emits methane – a gas 25 times worse for climate change than carbon dioxide. Lastly and certainly not least, there is a high social cost.

Read the full article.

Biocycle – San Diego

BioCycle is not only the trusted trade journal of the organics recycling industry, but also hosts two conferences each year – one on each coast – that bring together experts, thought leaders, and innovators. These photos capture some of the scene from this year’s conference in San Diego.

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CEO Chris Kasper, Lorraine Paskett, and Ashwani Kumar at Harvest’s booth

BioCycle 2016


CEO Chris Kasper answering questions and connecting with industry experts

 

 

BioCycle 2016

BioCycle Editor Nora Goldstein kicking off an educational session

 

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David Hitchcock and Chris Kasper flash smiles

 

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EcoSafe‘s signage for multifamily and educational facilities

 

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Mingling in the exhibit hall

 

 

Harvest Named to Global Cleantech 100 for Sixth Year in a Row!

2015_GlobalCleantech100_eBadge_Top100_071415This week Harvest is abuzz at the Cleantech Forum in San Francisco.  On Monday night, Harvest was named to the 2015 Cleantech 100; CEO Christian Kasper took the stage to accept the recognition. Then, on Tuesday afternoon he convenes with other leaders in the industry to discuss the circular economy and future opportunities. This is the sixth year in a row that Harvest Power has been recognized by the Cleantech Group for its contributions to the cleantech community.

We are honored. See the entire list of 100 companies.

Fame and Fortune with Food Waste

Kathleen Ligocki, courtesy of Mark Arbeit with the original at http://fortune.com/2015/09/09/harvest-power-kathleen-ligocki/September 2015 has been a big month for food waste aficionados, especially for Harvest Power’s CEO Kathleen Ligocki.

First, Ligocki was featured in Fortune‘s clever article on Harvest Power. The author, Beth Kowitt, observes, “What we eat – or rather don’t eat – is the next frontier of recycling, and Harvest is in a unique position to capitalize.”

Second, Food and Wine featured Ligocki in its “Most Innovative Women in Food and Drink” list alongside Jessica Alba, Lauren Bush Lauren, and Pashon Murray. Food and Wine has drunk the koolaid, asking, “What if a cast-off burrito could help power a car?” It could! It could!

Finally, next week Ligocki will present at Fortune Brainstorm E: Where Energy, Technology and Sustainability Meet. Other presenters include Walter Robb, Whole Foods Market’s Co-CEO; Jonathan Wolfson, Solazyme’s CEO; and Richard Kauffman, New York’s Chairman of Energy and Finance.

Where will food waste headline next?

Could your child’s uneaten broccoli help provide electricity?

fortuneHow Harvest Power is transforming food waste into a power source.

HIGHLIGHTS: “The site is far enough from the likes of Splash Mountain and the Cinderella Castle to keep the aroma of rotting lettuce and onions from disrupting the magic of the Magic Kingdom,” and “What we eat – or rather don’t eat – is the next frontier of recycling, and Harvest is in a unique position to capitalize.”  Read the full article.

Food Waste Ban Gets Teeth in Metro Vancouver Region

Your Food Isn't Garbage: Time to obey the food waste ban in BCThis July 1, 2015 marks the date when the food waste ban in the Metro Vancouver region of BC has some teeth.  If you live in the lower mainland, be sure to sort those scraps this Canada Day (and beyond)!

For news and support, check out:

For residents looking for easy tips for sorting scraps, check out our “3 Tips for Successful Sorting” video – easy peasy.