Food Waste Management in NYC

The big apple has some big apple cores to manage. In a recent New York Times article, Emily S. Rueb explores how the city is planning to expand food waste recycling. Here are the top elements we noticed.

  1. Accessible visuals. While some characterized the cartoons as “Jabba the Hutt-esque and scary,” they show some fairly intricate processes – sorting out plastics; turning organics into compost; turning organics into biogas used to power homes and fuel vehicles – with simple diagrams.
  2. Great quotes. Shout out to the ever eloquent Ron Gonen, who was part of our SXSW Eco “Food Waste Frontier” panel.
  3. Dense city!  The author provides a sense of the scale of the city with these statements: “Smaller cities like Portland, Ore.; San Francisco; and Seattle all have mandatory programs. But the population of those three places combined is smaller than Brooklyn or Queens alone.”
  4. Good portrayal of challenges. Many of the barriers to organic waste recycling – collection, hauling, costs, and processing – come to life. She notes that composters “are accustomed to processing farm waste like rotting vegetables, which is somewhat different from handling the Chinese takeout and fettuccine Alfredo that city dwellers toss.”
  5. Super links. Not only is the article well researched, but also includes links to actionable items in the Q&A at the end of the article.

Bravo to all who helped bring this story to life. Read it here.

Photos from US Composting Council’s “Demo Days” in Los Angeles

The US Composting Council hosted its 25th annual conference in Los Angeles.  Harvest was a proud sponsor of the conference, and provided safety gear for the legendary “Demo Days” event at the City of Lopez Canyon Compost Facility. Ops attendees included Ted C., Chris F., Brent B., and Stewart M. Check out the beautiful scene in the following photos (photos thanks to Ted):

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Fruit Flies Bugging You? Create a Quick Trap

CREATE A QUICK FRUIT FLY TRAP-01Summer is a delicious season. With melons, berries, and fruits dripping with juicy goodness, it’s easy to have sweets – natural sweets – on the counter. Alas! Those yummy fruits also beckon the little buggers known as fruit flies. If you would like to banish fruit flies – in any season – but do not want to hassle with plastic wrap, pin pricks, or creating other traps, try this trick:

  1. Put some apple cider vinegar into a dish.  (Any kind of cider will do, you only need a little layer – like a 1/2 cup, and a bowl or cup works. Make it easy on yourself.)
  2. Add a few drops of dishwashing soap.  (Any kind.) The soap will break the surface tension of the liquid.

Check out the simple fruit fly trap in action:

A few drops of dishwashing soap is added to some apple cider vinegar in a dish.  An hour later, the fruit flies have landed around the rim of the bowl.  Then, another hour later, the fruit flies have met their demise (not pictured). Simply toss the liquid (and dead fruit flies) down the drain and move on to enjoy your fruity treat.

fruit fly trap adding soap to apple cider vinegar

fruit flies come closer

Pumping Value out of Pumpkins: Food Waste Growth Markets

Pumpkins and Other Food WasteThe growth strategy firm, Innosight, published a piece, “The Food Waste Opportunity: How Experiments Can Open New Growth Markets.”  It explores the burgeoning food waste industry and highlights Harvest as a leader in providing organic management solutions.

Here’s one slice of the story:

This Cinderella transformation of discarded food is just one example of how marketplace experiments can help spur new growth markets. Venture capitalists are believers: Harvest Power has raised more than $350 million, making it one of the best-funded startups in New England.

And another bit:

Because food is an organic compound and readily biodegradable, one might assume that all this waste is not a major problem. However, consider this. Food takes resources to produce-water, land, fertilizer, energy. It’s heavy and expensive to transport. As food lies in a landfill, it decomposes and emits methane – a gas 25 times worse for climate change than carbon dioxide. Lastly and certainly not least, there is a high social cost.

Read the full article.

Biocycle – San Diego

BioCycle is not only the trusted trade journal of the organics recycling industry, but also hosts two conferences each year – one on each coast – that bring together experts, thought leaders, and innovators. These photos capture some of the scene from this year’s conference in San Diego.

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CEO Chris Kasper, Lorraine Paskett, and Ashwani Kumar at Harvest’s booth

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CEO Chris Kasper answering questions and connecting with industry experts

 

 

BioCycle 2016

BioCycle Editor Nora Goldstein kicking off an educational session

 

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David Hitchcock and Chris Kasper flash smiles

 

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EcoSafe‘s signage for multifamily and educational facilities

 

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Mingling in the exhibit hall

 

 

Harvest Named to Global Cleantech 100 for Sixth Year in a Row!

2015_GlobalCleantech100_eBadge_Top100_071415This week Harvest is abuzz at the Cleantech Forum in San Francisco.  On Monday night, Harvest was named to the 2015 Cleantech 100; CEO Christian Kasper took the stage to accept the recognition. Then, on Tuesday afternoon he convenes with other leaders in the industry to discuss the circular economy and future opportunities. This is the sixth year in a row that Harvest Power has been recognized by the Cleantech Group for its contributions to the cleantech community.

We are honored. See the entire list of 100 companies.

After Gobbling $20M, Harvest Still Hungry for Table Scraps

xconomyXconomy’s Jeff Engel explores the chicken-and-egg conundrum of communities that want to divert food scraps from landfills yet lack the capacity to do so. Harvest Power’s CEO Christian Kasper provides the path forward “to break that deadlock” and support North America with the infrastructure it needs to recycle organic waste. Read the article.