Food Waste Management in NYC

The big apple has some big apple cores to manage. In a recent New York Times article, Emily S. Rueb explores how the city is planning to expand food waste recycling. Here are the top elements we noticed.

  1. Accessible visuals. While some characterized the cartoons as “Jabba the Hutt-esque and scary,” they show some fairly intricate processes – sorting out plastics; turning organics into compost; turning organics into biogas used to power homes and fuel vehicles – with simple diagrams.
  2. Great quotes. Shout out to the ever eloquent Ron Gonen, who was part of our SXSW Eco “Food Waste Frontier” panel.
  3. Dense city!  The author provides a sense of the scale of the city with these statements: “Smaller cities like Portland, Ore.; San Francisco; and Seattle all have mandatory programs. But the population of those three places combined is smaller than Brooklyn or Queens alone.”
  4. Good portrayal of challenges. Many of the barriers to organic waste recycling – collection, hauling, costs, and processing – come to life. She notes that composters “are accustomed to processing farm waste like rotting vegetables, which is somewhat different from handling the Chinese takeout and fettuccine Alfredo that city dwellers toss.”
  5. Super links. Not only is the article well researched, but also includes links to actionable items in the Q&A at the end of the article.

Bravo to all who helped bring this story to life. Read it here.

4 replies
  1. Carlianna D.
    Carlianna D. says:

    If many restaurants teamed up together to start recycling food, there could be so many people putting those resources to compost, which in turn, will help bring the costs down for what it takes to produce food. A simple solution is have restaurants get a can designed for throwing fruits, vegetables, and other compostable foods in it. This could help fix so much.

    Reply
  2. Carlianna D.
    Carlianna D. says:

    If many restaurants teamed up together to start recycling food, there could be so many people putting those resources to compost, which in turn, will help bring the costs down for what it takes to produce food. A simple solution is have restaurants get a can designed for throwing fruits, vegetables, and other compostable foods in it. This could help fix so much

    Reply
  3. Dave
    Dave says:

    I can’t imagine the big apple not expanding their food waste and recycling system. New York is so populated with people, I wonder how they even say above water today. Thanks for this post!

    Reply
  4. towing service
    towing service says:

    I think is a great idea especially for bigger cities that don’t have enough room for waste. I wish my state would implement something ike this. We have a huge landfill in the middle of town that is a huge eyesore and just keeps getting bigger and bigger. I’m not sure what they plan to do when it gets to the point where there is no room to grow. It is actually very scary to think about what this means for the future. We need more people to take recycling more seriously. If they actually showed people the landfills all this waste is going to maybe everyone would start to take this problem a little more seriously.

    Reply

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