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Could your child’s uneaten broccoli help provide electricity?

fortuneHow Harvest Power is transforming food waste into a power source.

HIGHLIGHTS: “The site is far enough from the likes of Splash Mountain and the Cinderella Castle to keep the aroma of rotting lettuce and onions from disrupting the magic of the Magic Kingdom,” and “What we eat – or rather don’t eat – is the next frontier of recycling, and Harvest is in a unique position to capitalize.”  Read the full article.

MassCEC Awards $1.1 Million for Clean Energy Projects

Massachusetts Clean Energy CenterPRESS RELEASE: Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) CEO Alicia Barton recently announced $1.1 million in funding for three projects across Massachusetts – in Bourne, Freetown, and Hadley – that will convert organic materials into energy via anaerobic digestion technology.

“Harvest Power is excited about the potential to bring a new clean energy project to the town of Bourne,” said Kathleen Ligocki, CEO of Harvest Power. “In the spirit of true public/private partnerships, the grant from MassCEC helps attract private capital to commercialize innovative clean technologies and bring them to Massachusetts communities.”

Read the full press release.

Florida’s $6.2 billion Advanced Energy Economy

AEEAdvanced Energy Economy (AEE), a trade group representing purveyors of energy efficiency products and services, issued a report that asserts “advanced” energy industries currently account for an estimated $6.2 billion of annual revenue in Florida. View press release.

QUOTE

“Our Orlando renewable biogas facility demonstrates that we can convert tons of organic wastes that would otherwise be dumped into landfills into thousands of hours of clean energy for our communities,” said Kathleen Ligocki, CEO, Harvest Power. “This marquee project proves to municipal waste managers that they can recycle their organic wastes, transform them into valuable clean power and stabilize long term costs for their rate payers while creating new economy jobs for Floridians.”

COVERAGE

Cleveland Indians Have Home-Field Advantage on Recycling

ny timesThe New York Times, “Cleveland Indians Have a Home-Field Advantage on Recycling,” by Diane Cardwell

As governments and industry seek to reduce emissions of methane — a more powerful heat-trapping gas than carbon dioxide — by limiting the amount of organic waste in landfills, large food processors are looking for new ways to get rid of their leftovers. Food waste, an estimated 34 million tons a year, according to the Environmental Protection Agency’s most recent figures, is the largest component of landfills, which are responsible for roughly 18 percent of the nation’s methane emissions.

Interview with Burp Reynolds: Our Anaerobic Bacteria Mascot

Earlier this year Harvest Power sat down with Burp Reynolds, one of the anaerobic bacteria in our digester tanks in Orlando, Florida. The following is an excerpt of the transcript. Burp-Reynolds-300x225[1]

So Burp, what does a typical day look like for you?

My motto is to go with the flow. I mostly hang out at the 6th trophic level with the more “established” bacteria. We work hard – eating, drinking, farting, burping, and reproducing each and every day, 24 hours a day.

Wow, sounds like a lot of work!

Yes, it is, and we think it’s a very efficient use of our time. We’re not like those other renewable energy sources, like the photovoltaics sunning themselves and then sleeping at night. Or wind turbines that produce electricity that then gets lost in transmission lines on its way back to civilization. That’s just a silly situation. Give me my anaerobic bacteria tank and I’m convinced my team is the best in renewable energy.

Thanks so much for all your hard work. What can we do to keep you happy?

Keep the tank temperature steady, and the pH steady, and the fats, sugars and starches pumping in. If any of those conditions change we become “slack-teria”!

What’s your favorite holiday?

Halloween, for sure. We often get an extra batch of expired candy. I think I can speak for anaerobic bacteria around the world when I say we LOVE sugar even more than almost anything in the world. Valentine’s Day is also pretty good: hello candy hearts. Every day is good, though – I like to say that we’re #1 in the #1 and #2 business.

If you had a car, what would you have on the bumper sticker?

That’s easy: “Support Bacteria: It’s the Only Culture Some People Will Ever Have”

Anything else you want the rest of the world to know?

Tell our buddies in Ontario and British Columbia hello! And keep sending us your organic waste – we’ll use it to create power, and power plants!

Learn more at harvestpower.com

NationSwell

nationswell-150x61[1]NationSwell, “Inside the Business of Turning Your Leftovers into 33 Million Bags of Mulch,” by Chris Peak

Waste, energy and agriculture. These three massive topics will affect how our ecosystem fares in the future. Harvest Power, a company founded in 2008, is providing local solutions that intersect all three. And they start by changing one unlikely place: the municipal dump.

CapeNews

capenewsnet-150x64[1]CapeNews, “No Smell, No Noise, No Worry – Visit to Harvest Power Plant in Florida Allays Concerns,” by Michael J. Rausch.
A proposed new trash-to-gas-to-electricity facility proposed to be built and operated at a section of the Bourne landfill should not pose any odor or noise pollution problems to the town. That was the upshot of a presentation to the Bourne Board of Selectmen Tuesday night, February 17, by the Bourne Landfill Business Model Working Group and Harvest Power, the company that would build and run the plant.

Metro Vancouver hopes to boost compost rates with new ad campaign

 

business-in-vancouver[1]Business in Vancouver, “Metro Vancouver hopes to boost compost rates with new ad campaign.”

 

food scraps isnt garbage

Metro Vancouver is hoping an adorable mascot made out of pasta leftovers will convince residents that “food isn’t garbage.”

Banning organic material from the landfill will reduce methane gas, a contributor to global warming, according to Metro Vancouver. Businesses like Harvest Power and Delta-based EnviroSmart Organics turn food waste into valuable compost and, in Harvest Power’s case, energy.