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$42 Billion for Smarter Waste Management

Forbes[1]Forbes,$42 Billion for Smarter Waste Management,” by Heather Clancy

 

With the volume of municipal solid waste (MSW) projected to reach 2.2 billion tons by 2023 (compared with 1.5 billion tons this year), communities and businesses are reconsidering disposal strategies with an eye toward minimizing consumption and getting smarter about recovery.

That movement will inspire investments in smart waste technologies to help with collection, processing, energy recovery and disposal, to the tune of $42 billion cumulatively between now and 2023, predicts Navigant Research.

Balancing Digester Diets

Biomass Mag logoBiomass Magazine,Balancing Digester Diets” by Kate Fletcher

 

About twice the size of JC-Biomethane is Harvest Power’s 50,000-ton food waste community digester near Orlando, Florida. Some waste from Disney World is brought to the facility, including the Ritz-Carlton and JW Marriott hotels at Grande Lakes Orlando.

After contaminant removal in Harvest Power Florida’s low solids AD process, “the mix tank is used to mix some of the fat, oils and grease, food waste and the other types of materials and blend them together so you don’t send slugs of one heavy material over another into the digesters,” says Brandon Moffatt, senior vice president of energy for Harvest Power. “It’s trying to have the right mix and always trying to keep that in balance, so we’re continuing to optimize our recipe and make sure we have balanced feeding to make sure the system is stable.”

Fertile Opportunity Awaits for Food Waste Processors

Forbes[1]Forbes, “Fertile Opportunity Awaits for Food Waste Processors,” by Heather Clancy.

 

Five-year-old anaerobic digestion company Harvest Power, for example, is processing more than 2 million tons of organic waste per year at its “Energy Garden” facilities, producing approximately 33 million bags of soil and mulch in the process. “In North America, over the next few years, heightened consciousness about the alternatives to dumping organics wastes in landfills will drive tremendous opportunities for companies able to recycle organic wastes into clean energy for our communities and soil enhancement products for our gardens and agricultural land,” noted CEO Kathleen Ligocki early this year.

Could food waste power our cities

zdnetZDNet, “Could food waste power our cities?”  by Julie Mehta

 

In two giant airtight vats at Harvest Power’s Energy Garden in central Florida, quadrillions of microorganisms are feasting on orange peels, wilted lettuce, burnt bread crusts, and other food discarded by humans. In less than a month, these ravenous creatures consume waste that would have taken years to decompose in a landfill.

Better yet, they release immense amounts of gas — biogas, to be exact. This heady mix of roughly 60 pecent methane and 40 percent carbon dioxide is fed into generators to produce electricity to help power area businesses.