Posts

Fruit Flies Bugging You? Create a Quick Trap

CREATE A QUICK FRUIT FLY TRAP-01Summer is a delicious season. With melons, berries, and fruits dripping with juicy goodness, it’s easy to have sweets – natural sweets – on the counter. Alas! Those yummy fruits also beckon the little buggers known as fruit flies. If you would like to banish fruit flies – in any season – but do not want to hassle with plastic wrap, pin pricks, or creating other traps, try this trick:

  1. Put some apple cider vinegar into a dish.  (Any kind of cider will do, you only need a little layer – like a 1/2 cup, and a bowl or cup works. Make it easy on yourself.)
  2. Add a few drops of dishwashing soap.  (Any kind.) The soap will break the surface tension of the liquid.

Check out the simple fruit fly trap in action:

A few drops of dishwashing soap is added to some apple cider vinegar in a dish.  An hour later, the fruit flies have landed around the rim of the bowl.  Then, another hour later, the fruit flies have met their demise (not pictured). Simply toss the liquid (and dead fruit flies) down the drain and move on to enjoy your fruity treat.

fruit fly trap adding soap to apple cider vinegar

fruit flies come closer

Pumping Value out of Pumpkins: Food Waste Growth Markets

Pumpkins and Other Food WasteThe growth strategy firm, Innosight, published a piece, “The Food Waste Opportunity: How Experiments Can Open New Growth Markets.”  It explores the burgeoning food waste industry and highlights Harvest as a leader in providing organic management solutions.

Here’s one slice of the story:

This Cinderella transformation of discarded food is just one example of how marketplace experiments can help spur new growth markets. Venture capitalists are believers: Harvest Power has raised more than $350 million, making it one of the best-funded startups in New England.

And another bit:

Because food is an organic compound and readily biodegradable, one might assume that all this waste is not a major problem. However, consider this. Food takes resources to produce-water, land, fertilizer, energy. It’s heavy and expensive to transport. As food lies in a landfill, it decomposes and emits methane – a gas 25 times worse for climate change than carbon dioxide. Lastly and certainly not least, there is a high social cost.

Read the full article.

STORMFISHER ENVIRONMENTAL ACQUIRES ANAEROBIC DIGESTER

sf_logo_cmyk                    Harvest-Print-Preferred

Date: January 12, 2016

StormFisher Contact: Pearce Fallis, 647-892-1167, pfallis@stormfisher.com
Harvest Power Contact: Meredith Sorensen, 206-569-0344, msorensen@harvestpower.com

STORMFISHER ENVIRONMENTAL ACQUIRES ANAEROBIC DIGESTER

New Investment And Strong Regional Presence Enhance Growth Potential

London, Ontario – StormFisher Environmental Ltd. today announced it has acquired the London Energy Garden, an anaerobic digester that turns organic waste from southwestern Ontario into clean, renewable energy and natural fertilizers, from Harvest Ontario Partners, Ltd.

“We are excited to invest new capital and enhance operations at the London Energy Garden,” said Chris Guillon, Vice President of StormFisher Environmental. He continued, “These developments open up even more opportunities to serve the organic waste processing needs of the region.”

The facility, which was developed by Harvest Power, Inc., turns organic materials such as food scraps, food production residuals, fats oils and grease, and other discarded organic waste from food processors, retailers and food retail outlets into clean, local electricity and natural fertilizers.

“The facility is in good hands with StormFisher Environmental,” said Chris Kasper, CEO of Harvest Power. He added, “Their team was involved in the original design of the site, so it’s fitting to see their involvement come full circle.”

StormFisher Environmental is majority owned and operated by StormFisher, Ltd, a company with deep Ontario market knowledge and biogas experience. Harvest Power is a minority owner in StormFisher Environmental.

# # #

See PDF of announcement.

After Gobbling $20M, Harvest Still Hungry for Table Scraps

xconomyXconomy’s Jeff Engel explores the chicken-and-egg conundrum of communities that want to divert food scraps from landfills yet lack the capacity to do so. Harvest Power’s CEO Christian Kasper provides the path forward “to break that deadlock” and support North America with the infrastructure it needs to recycle organic waste. Read the article.

Fame and Fortune with Food Waste

Kathleen Ligocki, courtesy of Mark Arbeit with the original at http://fortune.com/2015/09/09/harvest-power-kathleen-ligocki/September 2015 has been a big month for food waste aficionados, especially for Harvest Power’s CEO Kathleen Ligocki.

First, Ligocki was featured in Fortune‘s clever article on Harvest Power. The author, Beth Kowitt, observes, “What we eat – or rather don’t eat – is the next frontier of recycling, and Harvest is in a unique position to capitalize.”

Second, Food and Wine featured Ligocki in its “Most Innovative Women in Food and Drink” list alongside Jessica Alba, Lauren Bush Lauren, and Pashon Murray. Food and Wine has drunk the koolaid, asking, “What if a cast-off burrito could help power a car?” It could! It could!

Finally, next week Ligocki will present at Fortune Brainstorm E: Where Energy, Technology and Sustainability Meet. Other presenters include Walter Robb, Whole Foods Market’s Co-CEO; Jonathan Wolfson, Solazyme’s CEO; and Richard Kauffman, New York’s Chairman of Energy and Finance.

Where will food waste headline next?

Could your child’s uneaten broccoli help provide electricity?

fortuneHow Harvest Power is transforming food waste into a power source.

HIGHLIGHTS: “The site is far enough from the likes of Splash Mountain and the Cinderella Castle to keep the aroma of rotting lettuce and onions from disrupting the magic of the Magic Kingdom,” and “What we eat – or rather don’t eat – is the next frontier of recycling, and Harvest is in a unique position to capitalize.”  Read the full article.