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Food Waste Ban Gets Teeth in Metro Vancouver Region

Your Food Isn't Garbage: Time to obey the food waste ban in BCThis July 1, 2015 marks the date when the food waste ban in the Metro Vancouver region of BC has some teeth.  If you live in the lower mainland, be sure to sort those scraps this Canada Day (and beyond)!

For news and support, check out:

For residents looking for easy tips for sorting scraps, check out our “3 Tips for Successful Sorting” video – easy peasy.

 

 

The Food Waste Frontier: Harvest Power Turns Juice into Juice

earth911Earth911, “The Food Waste Frontier: Harvest Power Turns Juice into Juice,” by Madeleine Somerville

I’m no stranger to green living and sometimes it feels like I’ve seen it all. I wrote a book chock full of recipes for things like Eco-friendly toothpaste and laundry detergent, I’ve interviewed green-trepreneurs, and I’ve reported on everything from sustainable schools to winter biking. But this story is without a doubt one of the coolest environmentally friendly initiatives I have ever seen.

Cleveland Indians Have Home-Field Advantage on Recycling

ny timesThe New York Times, “Cleveland Indians Have a Home-Field Advantage on Recycling,” by Diane Cardwell

As governments and industry seek to reduce emissions of methane — a more powerful heat-trapping gas than carbon dioxide — by limiting the amount of organic waste in landfills, large food processors are looking for new ways to get rid of their leftovers. Food waste, an estimated 34 million tons a year, according to the Environmental Protection Agency’s most recent figures, is the largest component of landfills, which are responsible for roughly 18 percent of the nation’s methane emissions.

Food Marketing Institute: The Power of Food Waste

Food Marketing Institute logoFMI, “The Power of Food Waste,” by Jeanne von Zastrow, Senior Director for Sustainability, Food Marketing Institute.

Our second stop took us to Harvest Power, a company whose vision is to find the highest and best use for the 500 million tons of organic material produced in North America each year. Currently, compostable organic material makes up the largest and heaviest portion of the overall waste stream in the U.S., according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Disney World’s biogas facility: a model for converting food waste into energy

guardian

Guardian Sustainable Business, “Disney World’s biogas facility: a model for converting food waste into energy,” by Marc Gunther

 

“The circular economy at Disney World may not be as pretty as Cinderella’s Castle, but this process for turning organic waste into energy, which is known as anaerobic digestion, could turn out to be the best way to extract value from food scraps and treated sewage that would otherwise wind up in a landfill.”

 

$42 Billion for Smarter Waste Management

Forbes[1]Forbes,$42 Billion for Smarter Waste Management,” by Heather Clancy

 

With the volume of municipal solid waste (MSW) projected to reach 2.2 billion tons by 2023 (compared with 1.5 billion tons this year), communities and businesses are reconsidering disposal strategies with an eye toward minimizing consumption and getting smarter about recovery.

That movement will inspire investments in smart waste technologies to help with collection, processing, energy recovery and disposal, to the tune of $42 billion cumulatively between now and 2023, predicts Navigant Research.

Massachusetts’ New Composting Rules: What They Really Mean

Boston-Globe[1]Boston Globe Magazine: Massachusetts’ New Composting Rules: What They Really Mean, by Chris Burdik

 

As of Oct. 1,Massachusetts has banned any establishment that creates a ton or more of food waste per week from sending as much as a carrot peel to the state’s rapidly dwindling available landfills. Despite a recycling rate topping 40 percent, Massachusetts businesses and households still toss about 6.5 million tons of garbage every year — enough to fill up Fenway Park 74 times.

Could food waste power our cities

zdnetZDNet, “Could food waste power our cities?”  by Julie Mehta

 

In two giant airtight vats at Harvest Power’s Energy Garden in central Florida, quadrillions of microorganisms are feasting on orange peels, wilted lettuce, burnt bread crusts, and other food discarded by humans. In less than a month, these ravenous creatures consume waste that would have taken years to decompose in a landfill.

Better yet, they release immense amounts of gas — biogas, to be exact. This heady mix of roughly 60 pecent methane and 40 percent carbon dioxide is fed into generators to produce electricity to help power area businesses.