$42 Billion for Smarter Waste Management

Forbes[1]Forbes,$42 Billion for Smarter Waste Management,” by Heather Clancy


With the volume of municipal solid waste (MSW) projected to reach 2.2 billion tons by 2023 (compared with 1.5 billion tons this year), communities and businesses are reconsidering disposal strategies with an eye toward minimizing consumption and getting smarter about recovery.

That movement will inspire investments in smart waste technologies to help with collection, processing, energy recovery and disposal, to the tune of $42 billion cumulatively between now and 2023, predicts Navigant Research.

Massachusetts’ New Composting Rules: What They Really Mean

Boston-Globe[1]Boston Globe Magazine: Massachusetts’ New Composting Rules: What They Really Mean, by Chris Burdik


As of Oct. 1,Massachusetts has banned any establishment that creates a ton or more of food waste per week from sending as much as a carrot peel to the state’s rapidly dwindling available landfills. Despite a recycling rate topping 40 percent, Massachusetts businesses and households still toss about 6.5 million tons of garbage every year — enough to fill up Fenway Park 74 times.

Could food waste power our cities

zdnetZDNet, “Could food waste power our cities?”  by Julie Mehta


In two giant airtight vats at Harvest Power’s Energy Garden in central Florida, quadrillions of microorganisms are feasting on orange peels, wilted lettuce, burnt bread crusts, and other food discarded by humans. In less than a month, these ravenous creatures consume waste that would have taken years to decompose in a landfill.

Better yet, they release immense amounts of gas — biogas, to be exact. This heady mix of roughly 60 pecent methane and 40 percent carbon dioxide is fed into generators to produce electricity to help power area businesses.