Posts

Pumping Value out of Pumpkins: Food Waste Growth Markets

Pumpkins and Other Food WasteThe growth strategy firm, Innosight, published a piece, “The Food Waste Opportunity: How Experiments Can Open New Growth Markets.”  It explores the burgeoning food waste industry and highlights Harvest as a leader in providing organic management solutions.

Here’s one slice of the story:

This Cinderella transformation of discarded food is just one example of how marketplace experiments can help spur new growth markets. Venture capitalists are believers: Harvest Power has raised more than $350 million, making it one of the best-funded startups in New England.

And another bit:

Because food is an organic compound and readily biodegradable, one might assume that all this waste is not a major problem. However, consider this. Food takes resources to produce-water, land, fertilizer, energy. It’s heavy and expensive to transport. As food lies in a landfill, it decomposes and emits methane – a gas 25 times worse for climate change than carbon dioxide. Lastly and certainly not least, there is a high social cost.

Read the full article.

Harvest Named to Global Cleantech 100 for Sixth Year in a Row!

2015_GlobalCleantech100_eBadge_Top100_071415This week Harvest is abuzz at the Cleantech Forum in San Francisco.  On Monday night, Harvest was named to the 2015 Cleantech 100; CEO Christian Kasper took the stage to accept the recognition. Then, on Tuesday afternoon he convenes with other leaders in the industry to discuss the circular economy and future opportunities. This is the sixth year in a row that Harvest Power has been recognized by the Cleantech Group for its contributions to the cleantech community.

We are honored. See the entire list of 100 companies.

After Gobbling $20M, Harvest Still Hungry for Table Scraps

xconomyXconomy’s Jeff Engel explores the chicken-and-egg conundrum of communities that want to divert food scraps from landfills yet lack the capacity to do so. Harvest Power’s CEO Christian Kasper provides the path forward “to break that deadlock” and support North America with the infrastructure it needs to recycle organic waste. Read the article.

Fame and Fortune with Food Waste

Kathleen Ligocki, courtesy of Mark Arbeit with the original at http://fortune.com/2015/09/09/harvest-power-kathleen-ligocki/September 2015 has been a big month for food waste aficionados, especially for Harvest Power’s CEO Kathleen Ligocki.

First, Ligocki was featured in Fortune‘s clever article on Harvest Power. The author, Beth Kowitt, observes, “What we eat – or rather don’t eat – is the next frontier of recycling, and Harvest is in a unique position to capitalize.”

Second, Food and Wine featured Ligocki in its “Most Innovative Women in Food and Drink” list alongside Jessica Alba, Lauren Bush Lauren, and Pashon Murray. Food and Wine has drunk the koolaid, asking, “What if a cast-off burrito could help power a car?” It could! It could!

Finally, next week Ligocki will present at Fortune Brainstorm E: Where Energy, Technology and Sustainability Meet. Other presenters include Walter Robb, Whole Foods Market’s Co-CEO; Jonathan Wolfson, Solazyme’s CEO; and Richard Kauffman, New York’s Chairman of Energy and Finance.

Where will food waste headline next?

Could your child’s uneaten broccoli help provide electricity?

fortuneHow Harvest Power is transforming food waste into a power source.

HIGHLIGHTS: “The site is far enough from the likes of Splash Mountain and the Cinderella Castle to keep the aroma of rotting lettuce and onions from disrupting the magic of the Magic Kingdom,” and “What we eat – or rather don’t eat – is the next frontier of recycling, and Harvest is in a unique position to capitalize.”  Read the full article.

MassCEC Awards $1.1 Million for Clean Energy Projects

Massachusetts Clean Energy CenterPRESS RELEASE: Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) CEO Alicia Barton recently announced $1.1 million in funding for three projects across Massachusetts – in Bourne, Freetown, and Hadley – that will convert organic materials into energy via anaerobic digestion technology.

“Harvest Power is excited about the potential to bring a new clean energy project to the town of Bourne,” said Kathleen Ligocki, CEO of Harvest Power. “In the spirit of true public/private partnerships, the grant from MassCEC helps attract private capital to commercialize innovative clean technologies and bring them to Massachusetts communities.”

Read the full press release.

Florida’s $6.2 billion Advanced Energy Economy

AEEAdvanced Energy Economy (AEE), a trade group representing purveyors of energy efficiency products and services, issued a report that asserts “advanced” energy industries currently account for an estimated $6.2 billion of annual revenue in Florida. View press release.

QUOTE

“Our Orlando renewable biogas facility demonstrates that we can convert tons of organic wastes that would otherwise be dumped into landfills into thousands of hours of clean energy for our communities,” said Kathleen Ligocki, CEO, Harvest Power. “This marquee project proves to municipal waste managers that they can recycle their organic wastes, transform them into valuable clean power and stabilize long term costs for their rate payers while creating new economy jobs for Floridians.”

COVERAGE

Cleveland Indians Have Home-Field Advantage on Recycling

ny timesThe New York Times, “Cleveland Indians Have a Home-Field Advantage on Recycling,” by Diane Cardwell

As governments and industry seek to reduce emissions of methane — a more powerful heat-trapping gas than carbon dioxide — by limiting the amount of organic waste in landfills, large food processors are looking for new ways to get rid of their leftovers. Food waste, an estimated 34 million tons a year, according to the Environmental Protection Agency’s most recent figures, is the largest component of landfills, which are responsible for roughly 18 percent of the nation’s methane emissions.