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Can B Corp Certification Help You Raise Capital?

 

triplepundit[1]Triple Pundit, “Can B Corp Certification Help You Raise Capital?” by Ryan Honeyman

 

While researching and writing “The B Corp Handbook,” I found that B Corp certification can help you attract: mission-driven or impact investors who consider social, environmental and financial criteria in their investment decisions; mainstream investors who are primarily interested in strong financial returns; and larger companies interested in acquiring a cutting-edge and innovative brand.

“Our shareholders knew about and supported our B Corp certification. Harvest Power is focused on profitability as a business, and I don’t think becoming a B Corporation contradicts that.”  – Paul Sellew, Founder, Harvest Power

 

 

Balancing Digester Diets

Biomass Mag logoBiomass Magazine,Balancing Digester Diets” by Kate Fletcher

 

About twice the size of JC-Biomethane is Harvest Power’s 50,000-ton food waste community digester near Orlando, Florida. Some waste from Disney World is brought to the facility, including the Ritz-Carlton and JW Marriott hotels at Grande Lakes Orlando.

After contaminant removal in Harvest Power Florida’s low solids AD process, “the mix tank is used to mix some of the fat, oils and grease, food waste and the other types of materials and blend them together so you don’t send slugs of one heavy material over another into the digesters,” says Brandon Moffatt, senior vice president of energy for Harvest Power. “It’s trying to have the right mix and always trying to keep that in balance, so we’re continuing to optimize our recipe and make sure we have balanced feeding to make sure the system is stable.”

Fertile Opportunity Awaits for Food Waste Processors

Forbes[1]Forbes, “Fertile Opportunity Awaits for Food Waste Processors,” by Heather Clancy.

 

Five-year-old anaerobic digestion company Harvest Power, for example, is processing more than 2 million tons of organic waste per year at its “Energy Garden” facilities, producing approximately 33 million bags of soil and mulch in the process. “In North America, over the next few years, heightened consciousness about the alternatives to dumping organics wastes in landfills will drive tremendous opportunities for companies able to recycle organic wastes into clean energy for our communities and soil enhancement products for our gardens and agricultural land,” noted CEO Kathleen Ligocki early this year.

A Food Waste Reduction Movement Gathers Steam

techonomyTechonomy, “A food Waste Reduction Movement Gathers Steam,” by Leslie Pascaud.

 

The good news is that both corporations and consumers now have access to a growing number of initiatives making it easier to avoid waste—solutions that go from farm to store to fridge, and all the way through to trash. A few examples:

  • Trash Power: A growing number of companies are monetizing even rotten food. Harvest Power has 40 plants across the North America that take food waste plus leaves and yard trimmings and through anaerobic digestion and composting transform them into renewable energy to power neighborhood homes. A fringe benefit: natural fertilizer that Harvest Power sells to farmers and landscapers.

Could food waste power our cities

zdnetZDNet, “Could food waste power our cities?”  by Julie Mehta

 

In two giant airtight vats at Harvest Power’s Energy Garden in central Florida, quadrillions of microorganisms are feasting on orange peels, wilted lettuce, burnt bread crusts, and other food discarded by humans. In less than a month, these ravenous creatures consume waste that would have taken years to decompose in a landfill.

Better yet, they release immense amounts of gas — biogas, to be exact. This heady mix of roughly 60 pecent methane and 40 percent carbon dioxide is fed into generators to produce electricity to help power area businesses.

What happens to your scraps? Vancouver’s green bin program reduces garbage heading to landfill by 40 per cent

province[1]The Province,What happens to your scraps?,” by Cassidy Olivier

 

If you’ve ever wondered what happens to the food scraps you toss into your green bin, the place to go looking for answers is at the end of a nondescript road just off Westminster Highway in Richmond.

That’s where you’ll find Joe Canning, general manager of Harvest Power, who will gladly walk you through the complicated, and entirely engrossing, process that turns yesterday’s leftovers into the building blocks for tomorrow’s food.