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Fame and Fortune with Food Waste

Kathleen Ligocki, courtesy of Mark Arbeit with the original at http://fortune.com/2015/09/09/harvest-power-kathleen-ligocki/September 2015 has been a big month for food waste aficionados, especially for Harvest Power’s CEO Kathleen Ligocki.

First, Ligocki was featured in Fortune‘s clever article on Harvest Power. The author, Beth Kowitt, observes, “What we eat – or rather don’t eat – is the next frontier of recycling, and Harvest is in a unique position to capitalize.”

Second, Food and Wine featured Ligocki in its “Most Innovative Women in Food and Drink” list alongside Jessica Alba, Lauren Bush Lauren, and Pashon Murray. Food and Wine has drunk the koolaid, asking, “What if a cast-off burrito could help power a car?” It could! It could!

Finally, next week Ligocki will present at Fortune Brainstorm E: Where Energy, Technology and Sustainability Meet. Other presenters include Walter Robb, Whole Foods Market’s Co-CEO; Jonathan Wolfson, Solazyme’s CEO; and Richard Kauffman, New York’s Chairman of Energy and Finance.

Where will food waste headline next?

Disney World’s biogas facility: a model for converting food waste into energy

guardianGuardian Sustainable Business, “Disney World’s biogas facility: a model for converting food waste into energy,” by Marc Gunther

 

The circular economy at Disney World may not be as pretty as Cinderella’s Castle, but this process for turning organic waste into energy, which is known as anaerobic digestion, could turn out to be the best way to extract value from food scraps and treated sewage that would otherwise wind up in a landfill.

 

“We’re able to turn all of the waste stream into productive products,” says Kathleen Ligocki, the chief executive of Harvest Power, a venture capital-funded clean-tech company that built the Florida facility. “This is our goal – pumpkins to power, waste to wealth.”

Fertile Opportunity Awaits for Food Waste Processors

Forbes[1]Forbes, “Fertile Opportunity Awaits for Food Waste Processors,” by Heather Clancy.

 

Five-year-old anaerobic digestion company Harvest Power, for example, is processing more than 2 million tons of organic waste per year at its “Energy Garden” facilities, producing approximately 33 million bags of soil and mulch in the process. “In North America, over the next few years, heightened consciousness about the alternatives to dumping organics wastes in landfills will drive tremendous opportunities for companies able to recycle organic wastes into clean energy for our communities and soil enhancement products for our gardens and agricultural land,” noted CEO Kathleen Ligocki early this year.